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May 20, 2009     Times
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May 20, 2009
 

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ARTICLES DUE BY 7:30am Wednesday May 27 FOR June 1 NEWSPAPER NOTE: Long articles submit- ted near the cut-offdate may be held over to the following issue due to availability of space. "It's old news, but there's nothing else wrong with it." Mark Twain O Published Twice A Month - 24 Issues AYear May 18, 2009 ,125 e Q ces Ceremonies begin at 10Am, Monday, May 25 at Veteran's Memorial - Mt. Pulaski Cemetery. In the event of rain, services will be held at the Mt. Pulaski American Legion Post Home. Raising of the Flag will be by Ralph Beccue, Former American Legion Post 447 Commander. National Anthem will be pre- sented by the Mt. Pulaski High School Band, under the direction of David Helms. Posting of the Colors will be by Mt. Pulaski American Legion Post 447, Mt. Pulaski VFW Post 777. and Mt. Pulaski SAL Squadron 447. Phil Bertoni, Master of Ceremonies and Mt. Pulaski American Legion Com- mander Post 447 will welcome those in attendance. Casey McCormick, Pastor of the First Christian Church, Mt. Pulaski will give the Invocation. Mt. Pulaski High School Band will present patriotic music. Mt. Pulaski Mayor, Bill Glaze will welcome those in attendance on behalf of the City of Mt. Pulaski. Children are invited to present flow- ers at the Veterans Monument. Veteran Units and Organizations will present Memorial Wreaths. Winners of the Sons of the American Legion Patriotic Essay Contests will read their winning entries. Memorial Day Speaker; SFC Mark Ballard, Camp Lincoln, Spring- field will deliver the address. Phil Bertoni will read the list of deceased area Veterans. Casey McCormick, Pastor of the First Christian Church, Mt. Pulaski will give the Benediction. Salute to Fallen Comrades will be given by Mt. Pulaski American Legion Post 447, Mt. Pulaski Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 777, and Mt. Pulaski SAL Squadron 447. Honor Guard will be Mt. Pulaski American Legion Ryman-Fuiten Post 447, Mt. Pulaski Veterans of Foreign Wars Seroggin Gee Post 777, and Mt. Pulaski SAL Squadron 447, Mt. Pulaski Boy & Cub Scout Troops, and Mt. Pulaski Phoenix Fire Department. Ceremonies will be held at Steenbergen Cemetery at 11:30 Am. Raising of the Flag will be by Mt. Pulaski VFW Post 777. Those in attendance will be wel- comed by Lt. Col. Joe Lucas, USAF - Retired; Master of Ceremonies, Chap- lain Mt. Pulaski American Legion Post 447. Casey McCormick, Pastor of the First Christian Church, Mt. Pulaski will give the Invocation. Music will be the Mt. Pulaski High School Band under the direction of David Helms and John Buckles on the piano presenting Patriotic Music. Memorial Day Speaker: SFC Mark Ballard, Camp Lincoln. Spring- field will deliver the address. Salute to Fallen Comrades will be given by Mt. Pulaski American Legion Post 447, Mt. Pulaski Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 777. and Mt. Pulaski SAL Squadron 447. The Steenbergen Cemetery Avenue of Flags will honor The Poppy was first chosen as The American Legion's memorial flower at the 1921 National Convention and was worn in memory of the men who lost their lives in World War I. Picture vast armies on two sides in a long four year battle, along a double line of trenches. This was Europe from 1914 to November 11, 1918. In this area of death and destruction, hundreds of thousands of American boys advanced in 1917 and 1918 determined to put an end to the horrible war. You all know the story of how they did end the war. restoring peace and liberty to sub- jected peoples. But, many thousands of fine young lives were required to complete the task. The one bright color on the shell torn fields and hills of these war-torn areas was the little, red poppy. On the edges of the trenches, in the ragged shell holes, brave little pop- pies grew and bloomed on the graves of those men buried in the sacred plots of French soil. which was Flanders Field. Remembrances of the cheery bright red flowers returned to America with our boys. And so, the poppy became the symbol of the dead. their memorial flower. It became the sign that the high ideals for which these brave young men gave their lives, still live, and are hon- ored. Soon a double significance was attached to our memorial poppy. Disabled veterans quickly learned to assemble poppies while growing well again. In Illinois, The Ameri- can Legion and Auxiliary are united in our efforts to help those hospitalized veterans within our state. Through the winter months, cut materials are delivered to these veter- ans and soon boxes of bright red poppies are ready for a big distribution in May.. And when payday arrives, what a thrill to receive their pay for a job well done! And what a joy it is to wear a poppy made by a disabled veteran, when you know the money it brought him filled a desperate need. All money taken in over the time Poppy Day arrives, many more veterans will be added. That is why each year, prior to Memorial Day, millions of Americans wear little red poppies in memory of those who have died in all wars and to assist in the rehabilitation of those veterans who are now hospitalized suffering from wounds and illness. This is the story of our Memorial Poppy, millions of which are distrib- uted by unpaid, volunteer workers on Poppy Day. Please remember by wear- ing a Poppy! Mt. Pulaski American Legion Auxiliary In Flanders Fields In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row That mark our place... and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn. saw sunset glow, Loved, and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields. -Col. John McCrae This poppy, as a memorial flower to the war dead, can be traced to a single individ- ual, Miss Moina Michael. She was so moved by Col. McCrae's poem that she wrote a response: .. the blood of heroes never dies But lends a luster to the red Of the flower that blooms above the dead In Flanders' Fields. On impulse, she bought a bouquet of pop- i! At the conclusion of the each Veteran buried at expenses is returned to the pies - all that New York City,s Wanamaker's i Mt. Pulaski Cemetery Steenbergen Cemetery. veterans and their families Department Store had- and handed them to i] through our service program, businessmen meeting at the New York YYICA ceremonies, Veterans will Veterans from the American Since the wars, we find our where she worked. She asked them to wear visit Vonderlieth Living Revolution to the Vietnam organizations carrying on for the poppy as a tribute to the fallen. Center at llAm. War are honored with this another generation. That was November 1918. World War I was At the present time, thou-over, but America's sons would rest forever Veterans will visit Veterans and moving salute, sands of veterans are confined 'in Flanders' Fields.' their families in the main reception room. Casey McCormick. Pastor of the Flags will be flown May 23 to beds in Illinois hospitals Later, she would spearhead a campaign First Christian Church', Mt. Pulaski (Saturday) 8Am until May 25 and we have not asyet reached that would result inthe adoption of the poppy will offer a prayer. (Memorial Day) at 5Pm. the peak of hospitalization. By as the national symbol of sacrifice.